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Day 318 – Letter to Rep. Faso: Thanks For Your “No” Vote on the Tax Bill. Next Time, Put Some Conviction Behind It, Mr. Faso.

Day 318 – Letter to Rep. Faso: Thanks For Your “No” Vote on the Tax Bill. Next Time, Put Some Conviction Behind It, Mr. Faso.

Image from WNYT.com

Dear Mr. Faso (NY 19),

Thank you for your vote against the House Republican tax plan. Your reasons for not voting for the bill, however, appear rather incomplete.  Yes, since last January you already betrayed thousands of your constituents by having voted for a health care bill (that was defeated) which would have made their prior-condition status a financial disaster. Yes, you already showed your contempt for the health care provided to women by voting to pull funds from Planned Parenthood. Yes, you showed complete disdain for innocent lives by sponsoring a national concealed carry bill.

But still, I would have thought that your strong sense of political self-preservation would have caused you to say that you could not support this bill because this bill has not received sufficient exposure to committee, public input, and close examination, yet it was rushed through in order to save the face of a man who pursues policy based on admittedly false news, a man who has no sense of the responsibilities of the office he holds, and a man who demeans women.

You could have said that you would not support this bill because those making less than a yearly income of $100,000 dollars will ultimately lose money while corporations will keep a generous tax break in perpetuity. Thirty-five percent of the stock holders in these corporations are foreign nationals. U.S.  citizens will assume an obscene indebtedness while foreign interests will profit.

The corporations, which it appears you believe deserve more of a break than American tax payers, these corporations, sir, do not have a sterling record. Enron actually stranded people in elevators in summer heat in an effort to increase its profits. Enron also destroyed pension funds and the stock market while its executives attempted to hide millions they had managed to remove before the public became aware of the crisis. Then there were the banking fraud practices of Wells Fargo, creatively forging customers identities on dummy accounts. And the lead scandals of the toothpaste tubes and children’s toys and jewelry. The Volkswagen deceptive environmental practices debacle, the black water that the fracking of gas leaves in its wake, the opioid pushing by pharmaceutical companies, and the financial near-collapse of the country thanks to the greedy mismanagement of the banks and the financial ratings houses.

So, couldn’t have said that you could not vote for this obscene bill because of these reasons too?

Your tenure is half over. Over is the operative word here for your political career. No matter what happens to this ugly, mean spirited tax bill, you need to find a new job. You can always go back to lobbying.

Sincerely,

An Unwilling Constituent and Letters2Trump

 

Day 305 – Zip It, Mr. President. Please Give the Twitter Machine a Rest. And Maybe Stop Talking Off Script, Too. Or Just Stop Talking.

Day 305 – Zip It, Mr. President. Please Give the Twitter Machine a Rest. And Maybe Stop Talking Off Script, Too. Or Just Stop Talking.

Image from Jeff Gates

Mr. President,

It’s your party and you’ll cry if you want to, via Twitter of course.  Your attack on Senator Flake on your favorite social media platform is another example of your clear and utter lack of understanding of how politics work in America. Calling his political career “toast” and assuming he will vote “no” on your flawed tax cut bill proves once again that you are not fit to lead the country you claim to love so much.

You must believe that no strategy is the best strategy because it is clear you have no plan in place to “make America great again.”  Personal attacks on those who dare to oppose you are the acts of a scared and delusional man who’s more worried about hurt feelings than helping the people who truly make this country great.  Twitter is not your friend, Mr. President. You could take some sage advice from Bambi’s “Thumper.” If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.  The assumption that you are our “favorite” president is laughable as well.  The dissent of hard working Americans and your own political party clearly proves the opposite to be true. You know what they say about assuming, Mr. President.  Mr. Flake and so many prominent members of your own party have voiced their opinions against your “devil may care” brand of politics and it’s time you start paying attention.

The people of this country need legislation that will help their forward progress and not encourage a lifestyle of struggling to make ends meet. Your tax cuts seem to favor big business and it’s no surprise as you’ll always stand to gain in that department. Countless Republican Senators will not vote for your plan as it stands and that speaks volumes about the legitimacy of your plan. Mr. President, it’s time to stop tweeting and start acting presidential. For the sake of the nation and the world at large, we implore you Mr. President, lead by example, not 280 characters on a computer screen.

Sincerely,

Letters2Trump

 

Day 291 – The Tax Code Changes Will Have The Wealthy Rolling in Even More Cash, Mr. President. Way To Go!

Day 291 – The Tax Code Changes Will Have The Wealthy Rolling in Even More Cash, Mr. President. Way To Go!

Image from Pinterest

Mr. President,

Great job on your budget (or Ryan’s if it goes down); I am so impressed that you are willing to try that trickle down feint. Who would have thought that after the debt the U.S. incurred under Reagan and Bush with that scam that it would play again? I’ve been out of the country (so much easier to travel now if you have the money and no accent), so I had to depend on the scuttlebutt I picked up here and there.

That jerk up the road, the global warming looney, who reads that rag The New York Times told me that the paper on Friday said that many of the changes in the tax code would actually raise taxes on nearly 13 million people who earn $ 100,000 or less a year. Apparently the NY Times used open-source economics modeling software Tax Brain to come up with that theory.  Facts! Who needs ’em? Not us. You and I don’t know what we don’t know and have the money to just say deal with it.

Like yourself I’m a product of legacy money and a laissez-faire approach to the rights of others. I applaud your landing with both feet on that group of “middle income-aspire-ers” by allowing no deductions on the loans some of them had to take out just to pay for their college and graduate education. Hey, you losers, next time choose the right father – money and a healthy respect for greed, am I right? And that part of the budget that limits mortgage interest loan deduction to $500,000…wow, that one will keep all those mid-level office workers, civil servants, nurses, and teachers out of the better neighborhoods where they work. Let them have a long commute: we can use the space and keep the neighborhoods safe from riff-raff.

I also like that this plan of yours (Ryan’s, if it fails) will nail those malingerers who whined about losing affordable health care. Under this tax plan of yours (or McConnell’s, if it fails) tax payers who have high out of pocket expenses for medical costs for themselves or their kids can no longer deduct such expenses. Who told them to breed, anyway? (Well maybe the Catholic Church, but even it doesn’t really care what becomes of those babies after they’re born.)

Oh, and I almost forgot. Newsweek apparently reported that there was a memo circulating around the Republican caucus that defines low and middle income taxpayers as including those who earn $450,000 a year. What a great idea to put the top .05% of taxpayers in the low and mid-income range. That way those poor suckers who are really low and middle income will fall for the whole scam. Brilliant!

Maybe the best part of the scam is that part about the corporate tax rate drop. We the rich, who can never get enough, will get a windfall any way it crumbles. We get the cut, and we keep it, our stocks go higher, we hold most of the stocks, we don’t increase pay (although the rubes who fall for this think we will), we keep the windfall, stuff it in our overseas accounts, and watch the others fight over half a loaf of bread. And, best yet, as Stephen M. Rosenthal, a tax lawyer and senior fellow at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, figured out, since 35% of the United States stocks are foreign-owned, about $70 billion a year of the tax bill, which will increase the national U.S. debt, will go to people in other countries.

Good job, Donny (or crap job, Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell, if it fails).

Yours while the money keeps coming my way.

Sincerely,

Letters2Trump

Day 275 – Tax Cuts and Credit Card Debt: Examining the Numbers for You, Mr. President.

Day 275 – Tax Cuts and Credit Card Debt: Examining the Numbers for You, Mr. President.

Image by Images Money

Mr. President,

I was struck recently by a contrast between two very large, very similar numbers in the news recently. They both are about money, so I know you’ll have at least some interest in this, but I would invite you to consider the implications.

The first number was for the budget resolution your party recently pushed through the Senate: $1.5 trillion in tax cuts. That is an impressive amount of spending for a party that prides itself on being fiscally responsible, don’t you think? We don’t have many particulars about just what taxes are going to be cut, as such details are pesky things that might invite public comment or require some kind of agreement in the caucus, but going by past tax cuts, it seems reasonable to assume that the vast majority of that money will be going to the wealthiest members of our society.

The second number is a bit smaller in a relative sense, but still enormous: $1 trillion. That’s the estimate of how much outstanding credit card debt is owed by the American public as a whole. And being credit card debt, all that money is making more money for banks at very high interest rates while the people who owe it struggle to pay for utilities, rent, and food. The banks are very pleased about this, of course, but I wonder how long this can last. If people declare bankruptcy en masse as the debt gets to be too much, will we have to bail out the banks again?

Now, I know what your argument will be: Those tax cuts are going to “Job Creators” who will help those people in debt by putting them to work. Leaving aside the question of whether the jobs will actually be good enough to pull people out of debt in an era of stagnant wages, I would submit that there is a different class of job creators: consumers. All the tax cuts in the world aren’t going to make companies open new factories if there’s no demand for their products. Imagine the improvement in consumer demand that would result if people were no longer stifled by $1 trillion in debt. I bet we’d have to create a lot of jobs to meet it.

Corporate welfare has had its chance to improve the economy; why not try debt relief instead?

Sincerely,

Letters2Trump

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